Souls not lost, but sacrificed for peace and freedom

The chapel in the American Cemetery at the Omaha beach
The chapel in the American Cemetery at the Omaha beach
  • In my last post about France, I mentioned two amazing places in Normandy – Mt. Saint Michel and Saint Malo. In this one I want to talk about a place that has a heavy historical importance for Europe and to an extent to the US and Canada.

    It’s not a fancy place, not a fashionable or perfect for fun, but it’s perfect to pay respect to all those people who sacrificed their lives for our peace today on the coast of Normandy.

    Normandy, is the place where the largest seaborne invasion in history took place. In just one night 24,000 British, US, and Canadian airborne troops landed on the coast. The Normandy coast was divided into five sectors: Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno, and Sword Beach. Due to bad weather conditions the mission was partially successful and that success had a very high price. Only in one day (also called the D-Day) the number of the casualties were around 1,000 men on the German side and at least 10,000, with 4,414 confirmed dear on allies side. The biggest loss of lives was at Omaha beach, and that’s perhaps the reason why just on the cliffs overlooking the beach, today, it’s the American cemetery which contains 9387 white crosses in Carrare marble. There’s also a chapel and a memorial dedicated to the youth of America.

Omaha Beach, view from the hill
Omaha Beach, view from the hill

On the flyers we got at the entrance, it was stated that annually about 3mln of visitors come to this place. Family and relatives of those who have lost their lives, people who want to pay respect to those who have a big share in our happiness and peace today.

At 200m behind Omaha beach you can find Omaha Museum which presents each phase of the US sector, from the occupation up to D-Day. Exhibition of weapons, uniforms, military vehicles, 155mm gun, landing barge, Sherman tank. Panels on different themes.

This picture tells a story.  Army Sgt Major Robert Blatnik returns to Omaha Beach. (by Doug Dunbar/KTVT/KTXA)
This picture tells a story. Army Sgt Major Robert Blatnik returns to Omaha Beach. (by Doug Dunbar/KTVT/KTXA)

For more information about Omaha beach and all other places in Normandy that were under fire during the WII, visit these pages:

Trying to solve problems using violence won’t result in positive results but in bigger problems. The world needs peace. The past is our bloody lesson that we should keep in mind, so that any egos, ambitions, complexes or extreme views on religion and life can’t shake us and pull us into another bloody war.

American Cemetery - Omaha Beach, Normandy, France
American Cemetery – Omaha Beach, Normandy, France

Let’s make this planet a better place to live, for us and for the generations to come!

Travel safe and wise!

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